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Pa. Company Recalling Nearly 32,000 Pounds of Chicken Products

neirfy/iStockphoto/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — A Penn­syl­va­nia com­pany is recall­ing nearly 32,000 pounds of gluten-free breaded chicken prod­ucts that may be con­t­a­m­i­nated with bacteria.

Accord­ing to the United States Depart­ment of Agri­cul­ture said in a press release Sat­ur­day that Murry’s Inc. is recalled 31,689 pounds of chicken prod­ucts that may con­tain Staphy­lo­coc­cal enter­toxin. All of the prod­ucts have a “best by” date of Aug. 9, 2015.

The recall affects 12-ounce boxes of “Bell & Evans Gluten Free Breaded Chicken Breast Nuggets” and 10.5-ounce boxes of “Bell & Evans Gluten Free Breaded Chicken Breast.” All prod­ucts sub­ject to recall have the estab­lish­ment num­ber “P-516″ inside the USDA mark of inspection.

The prod­ucts were shipped nationwide.

The USDA says that the tox­ins that may have con­t­a­m­i­nated the prod­ucts are “fast act­ing, some­times caus­ing ill­ness in as lit­tle as 30 min­utes.” Symp­toms include nau­sea, vom­it­ing, stom­ach cramps and diar­rhea.” Most patients do recover after one to three days.

Fol­low @ABCNewsRadio
Copy­right 2014 ABC News Radio

 

Fiancee's Family Confident in Medical Care Ebola Doctor Receiving

Craig Spencer/LinkedIn(NEW YORK) — The fam­ily of Mor­gan Dixon, the fiancée of the New York doc­tor who tested pos­i­tive for Ebola, said in a state­ment Sat­ur­day that they are con­fi­dent in the med­ical care he’s receiving.

Dr. Craig Spencer has been in an iso­la­tion unit at Belle­vue Hos­pi­tal in Man­hat­tan since Thurs­day. His fiancée, Mor­gan Dixon, is also quar­an­tined there, although she hasn’t shown any symp­toms of the virus.

The Dixon fam­ily is ask­ing for your thoughts and prayers for Craig Spencer and his fiancee, our daugh­ter, Mor­gan Dixon,” read the statement.

The Dixon fam­ily said they have not had phys­i­cal con­tact with their daugh­ter or Spencer, 33, since his return to New York from Guinea.

Two friends of Spencer are also under quar­an­tine at home. Nei­ther has shown symp­toms of the virus.

Spencer became the fourth per­son to be diag­nosed with Ebola in the United States after he was hos­pi­tal­ized Thurs­day. He devel­oped a fever that morn­ing and alerted author­i­ties, who trans­ported the doc­tor from his Harlem apart­ment in a spe­cially des­ig­nated ambulance.

We have con­fi­dence in the med­ical care Craig is receiv­ing and we are hop­ing for a com­plete recov­ery,” the Dixon fam­ily said.

Health offi­cials said he felt tired on Tues­day and then spent a day out in the city on Wednes­day. Spencer returned to the U.S. on Octo­ber 17 after treat­ing Ebola patients for Doc­tors With­out Borders.

We are very proud of and sup­port the work Craig has been involved with through­out this career,” the Dixon fam­ily said.

Fol­low @ABCNewsRadio

Copy­right 2014 ABC News Radio

 

Study Says Listening to Gossip Impacts Self Evaluation

Ridofranz/iStockphoto/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Researchers from the Nether­lands say that lis­ten­ing to gos­sip impacts the way we judge ourselves.

The study, pub­lished in the jour­nal Per­son­al­ity and Social Psy­chol­ogy Bul­letin, looked at two sep­a­rate groups, con­sist­ing of a total of 305 under­grad­u­ate stu­dents. The stu­dents lis­tened to either pos­i­tive or neg­a­tive gos­sip, and found that either form could have a pos­i­tive impact on their feel­ings about themselves.

Lis­ten­ing to pos­i­tive gos­sip, researchers said, allowed the lis­ten­ers to use the infor­ma­tion they heard for self-improvement. Mean­while, lis­ten­ing to neg­a­tive gos­sip gave lis­ten­ers an ego boost, as they felt supe­rior to the per­son being gos­siped about.

Those stu­dents who lis­tened to neg­a­tive gos­sip were, how­ever, more guarded, out of con­cern that they too may be the sub­ject of gos­sip behind their backs.

The study also found that men and women react to hear­ing gos­sip slightly dif­fer­ently. Women who lis­tened to neg­a­tive gos­sip were more likely to be con­cerned about their own risk of being gos­siped about than men, while men who heard pos­i­tive gos­sip expe­ri­enced more fear.

Fol­low @ABCNewsRadio
Copy­right 2014 ABC News Radio

 

NJ, NY Toughen Ebola Quarantine Rules After Doctor Case

ABC News(NEW YORK) — The New York doc­tor who tested pos­i­tive for Ebola wasn’t required to quar­an­tine him­self when he returned to New York City after treat­ing Ebola patients in Guinea. Instead, Dr. Craig Allen Spencer went about his life, hit­ting a pop­u­lar restau­rant and bowl­ing alley before his diag­no­sis — and send­ing health offi­cials scram­bling in the aftermath.

But the rules on quar­an­tines are changing.

Gov­er­nors in New York and New Jer­sey announced Fri­day that they would enforce manda­tory quar­an­tines for all trav­el­ers who had con­tact with Ebola-infected peo­ple and were arriv­ing from Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone. This comes one day after Spencer’s Ebola diag­no­sis, and two days after the U.S. Cen­ters for Dis­ease Con­trol tight­ened guide­lines to require 21-day self-monitoring — but not quar­an­tines — for trav­el­ers to Ebola-affected regions.

Fri­day, a woman who cared for Ebola patients in Sierra Leone was quar­an­tined in Newark, New Jer­sey, after her plane landed. She was orig­i­nally quar­an­tined despite not hav­ing any symp­toms. Hours later, how­ever, offi­cials said the woman, who was not iden­ti­fied, has a fever. She is in iso­la­tion and under­go­ing tests.

This marks a very dif­fer­ent approach, quar­an­ti­ning some­one who wore pro­tec­tive gear when they had con­tact with an Ebola patient. It would not be based on sci­ence, which would say she is not at risk,” said Dr. Richard Besser, ABC News chief health and med­ical edi­tor. “How­ever, given all the work the city has decided to under­take because Dr. Spencer was around town before he got sick, per­haps that is why New York and New Jer­sey have decided to take a dif­fer­ent approach.”

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Doc­tors who have treated Ebola patients in West Africa are required to self-monitor for the 21-day incu­ba­tion period, but they are not required to self-quarantine,according to guide­lines from Doc­tors With­out Bor­ders, for whom Spencer was work­ing overseas.

Self-quarantine is nei­ther war­ranted nor rec­om­mended when a per­son is not dis­play­ing Ebola-like symp­toms,” the orga­ni­za­tion said Thurs­day in a state­ment. “How­ever, returned staff mem­bers are dis­cour­aged from return­ing to work dur­ing the 21-day period.”

This fits with CDC guide­lines, which indi­cate that because Spencer was wear­ing pro­tec­tive gear when he was around Ebola patients, he was not required to be quarantined.

Spencer, 33, had been treat­ing Ebola patients in Guinea until Oct. 12, New York City Depart­ment of Health Com­mis­sioner Dr. Mary Bas­sett said Fri­day. Spencer left Guinea on Oct. 14 and arrived in New York’s John F. Kennedy Inter­na­tional Air­port on Oct. 17 fol­low­ing a stopover in Brus­sels, Belgium.

Doc­tors With­out Bor­ders Guide­lines requires doc­tors like Spencer to take their tem­per­a­ture twice a day and to stay within four hours of a hos­pi­tal for the 21-day incu­ba­tion period. They are also sup­posed to con­tact Doc­tors With­out Bor­ders if they devel­oped any symptoms.

The CDC announced on Wednes­day — after Spencer arrived back in the United States — that all air­line pas­sen­gers trav­el­ing from Ebola-affected nations would get Ebola kits and be required to self-monitor for 21 days. They are required to take their tem­per­a­ture twice daily and answer sev­eral ques­tions about their symp­toms, accord­ing to the CDC. If they do not report, they will be tracked down, the agency said Wednesday.

In the days before Spencer was diag­nosed with Ebola, he trav­eled to Manhattan’s High­line Park and a pop­u­lar restau­rant called The Meat­ball Shop on Tues­day. The next day, he took a 3-mile run along River­side Park and trav­eled on the sub­way to Brook­lyn, where he went bowl­ing. He was fatigued, but had no fever, offi­cials said.

On Thurs­day morn­ing, Spencer recorded a tem­per­a­ture of 100.3 and called Doc­tors With­out Bor­ders, who con­tacted New York author­i­ties. Emer­gency respon­ders arrived at his north­ern Man­hat­tan apart­ment in full pro­tec­tive gear and took him to Belle­vue Hos­pi­tal, where he was placed in iso­la­tion and later diag­nosed with Ebola, accord­ing to officials.

Extremely strict pro­ce­dures are in place for staff dis­patched to Ebola affected coun­tries before, dur­ing, and after their assign­ments,” said Sophie Delau­nay, exec­u­tive direc­tor of Doc­tors With­out Bor­ders. “Despite the strict pro­to­cols, risk can­not be com­pletely elim­i­nated. How­ever, close post-assignment mon­i­tor­ing allows for early detec­tion of cases and for swift iso­la­tion and med­ical management.”

Spencer’s fiancee was placed in quar­an­tine, but she has shown no symp­toms so far, offi­cials said.

Until today, out of more than 700 expa­tri­ate staff deployed so far to West Africa, no MSF [Doc­tors With­out Bor­ders] staff per­son has devel­oped con­firmed Ebola symp­toms after return­ing to their home coun­try,” Doc­tors With­out Bor­ders said in a statement.

Fol­low @ABCNewsRadio
Copy­right 2014 ABC News Radio

 

Evenflo Recalling Over 200,000 Child Car Seats

Even­flo(NEW YORK) — Even­flo is recall­ing over 200,000 child car seats.

The buck­les in the Embrace and AmSafe mod­els can report­edly become dif­fi­cult to unlatch, espe­cially after a child has been eat­ing or drink­ing in the seat. The buckle can allegedly get sticky if its spilled on, mak­ing it harder to get a child out dur­ing an emergency.

Own­ers can get replace­ment buck­les if requested.

Fol­low @ABCNewsRadio
Copy­right 2014 ABC News Radio

 

Does Your Doctor Owe Thousands in Unpaid Student Loans?

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — There are 846 doc­tors and den­tists in 43 states who have been named by the U.S. Depart­ment of Edu­ca­tion on a pub­lic list in a des­per­ate effort to get them to repay their defaulted stu­dent loans.

And because the loans were fed­er­ally guar­an­teed, it’s tax­pay­ers who are left with the bill.

Physi­cians have a higher call­ing in the com­mu­nity. They have a higher respon­si­bil­ity,” Tom Schatz of Cit­i­zens Against Gov­ern­ment Waste told ABC News’ 20/20. “The Hip­po­cratic Oath says, ‘Do no harm.’ Why should they be doing harm to taxpayers?”

Many of the doc­tors appear to be liv­ing lives of lux­ury and oper­ate prac­tices in high rent places, includ­ing Mal­ibu, Cal­i­for­nia, or Key Bis­cayne, Florida. But the doc­tors on the list have col­lec­tively defaulted on over $100 mil­lion in stu­dent loans.

Con­gress cre­ated the fed­er­ally guar­an­teed loan pro­gram for aspir­ing doc­tors in the 1970s, but because of the high default rate, it pulled the plug on the pro­gram in the 1990s.

That’s when the gov­ern­ment decided to pub­li­cize the list to shame doc­tors into pay­ing up. The gov­ern­ment has also seized doc­tors’ tax refunds, pre­vented the doc­tors from par­tic­i­pat­ing in Medicare, filed law­suits and even gar­nished bank accounts.

They were more likely to pay the money back because it’s embar­rass­ing to them pro­fes­sion­ally,” Schatz said.

ABC’s New York sta­tion WABC launched its own inves­ti­ga­tion and tracked down sev­eral doc­tors on the list, includ­ing Brook­lyn den­tist Sammy Saa­dia, who owes $156,000, and Mont­clair, New Jer­sey, podi­a­trist Demi Turner, who owes almost $700,000, accord­ing to the Depart­ment of Education.

They con­tinue to prac­tice med­i­cine. They make money, and there’s absolutely no legit­i­mate rea­son not to pay that money back,” Schatz said.

Den­tist Mladen Kralj is one of the doc­tors on the list. He runs a den­tal prac­tice in the pent­house of an office build­ing in Chicago’s Gold Coast sec­tion. Kralj owes the gov­ern­ment over $394,107, yet he had the money to buy two con­dos in a ren­o­vated loft build­ing in down­town Chicago.

I’m actu­ally in repay­ment form with them. I’ve had some issues here,” Kralj said when con­fronted by 20/20.

Kralj’s loans date back over 23 years. He was sued by the Jus­tice Depart­ment and was ordered to pay back the money.

But as of today, Kralj’s out­stand­ing debt is big­ger than ever because of prin­ci­ple and inter­est. Kralj told 20/20 that he went through tough times after los­ing an investor in his busi­ness. He said he hasn’t been paid in nine months.

There’s cir­cum­stances in my life that are very sen­si­tive that hap­pened dur­ing this part, that I’ve never been able to catch up on,” Kralj said. “I’m try­ing to take respon­si­bil­ity for all of this sim­ply because it’s caught up. And the thing is, try­ing to main­tain a prac­tice and try­ing to pay off loans and try­ing to get ahead, it’s difficult.”

Over the years, being on the pub­lic list has largely worked. Many doc­tors and den­tists on the list have paid back thou­sands of dol­lars, leav­ing only the stal­wart hold­outs, like lead­ing podi­a­trist and sports med­i­cine spe­cial­ist Dr. Scott Kantro.

Kantro, who also made a name for him­self as a med­ical inven­tor, lives in an upscale home on five acres of prop­erty in New York. But accord­ing to the list, he cur­rently owes $287,819 for loans he took out in 1979.

While he refused to speak to 20/20 on cam­era, Kantro claimed he had actu­ally paid his debt off 30 years ago and that it was all a mis­take. But when 20/20 asked for his per­mis­sion to check out his story with the gov­ern­ment, he refused.

There’s some level of sym­pa­thy, per­haps, at this point, but not over this long period of time.” Schatz said. “It means that resources have been spent by the gov­ern­ment to even get to this point. Thirty per­cent of these peo­ple have been on since 1995. That’s a really long time to keep fight­ing and not paying.”

Click here to find out if your doc­tor or den­tist is on the list. Then tune in for the full story on ABC News’ 20/20 Fri­day at 10 p.m. ET.

Fol­low @ABCNewsRadio
Copy­right 2014 ABC News Radio

 

Why New York Doctor with Ebola Didn't Quarantine Himself

Craig Spencer/LinkedIn(NEW YORK) — There’s a rea­son Dr. Craig Allen Spencer, who has tested pos­i­tive for Ebola, didn’t quar­an­tine him­self when he returned to New York after treat­ing Ebola patients in Guinea.

He didn’t have to.

Accord­ing to Doc­tors With­out Bor­ders guide­lines, doc­tors who have treated Ebola patients in West Africa are required to self-monitor for the 21-day incu­ba­tion period, but they are not required to self-quarantine.

Self-quarantine is nei­ther war­ranted nor rec­om­mended when a per­son is not dis­play­ing Ebola-like symp­toms,” the orga­ni­za­tion said Thurs­day in a state­ment. “How­ever, returned staff mem­bers are dis­cour­aged from return­ing to work dur­ing the 21-day period.”

Spencer, 33, had been treat­ing Ebola patients in Guinea with Doc­tors With­out Bor­ders until Oct. 12, New York City Depart­ment of Health Com­mis­sioner Dr. Mary Bas­sett said on Fri­day. Spencer left Guinea on Oct. 14 and arrived in New York’s John F. Kennedy Inter­na­tional Air­port on Oct. 17 fol­low­ing a stopover Brus­sels, Belgium.

Doc­tors With­out Bor­ders Guide­lines requires doc­tors like Spencer to take their tem­per­a­ture twice a day and to stay within four hours of a hos­pi­tal for the 21-day incu­ba­tion period. They are also sup­posed to con­tact Doc­tors With­out Bor­ders if they develop any symptoms.

In the days before Spencer was diag­nosed with Ebola, he trav­eled to Manhattan’s High­line Park and a pop­u­lar restau­rant called The Meat­ball Shop on Tues­day. The next day, he took a 3-mile run along River­side Park and trav­eled on the sub­way to Brook­lyn, where he went bowl­ing. He was fatigued, but had no fever, offi­cials said.

On Thurs­day morn­ing, Spencer recorded a tem­per­a­ture of 100.3 and called Doc­tors With­out Bor­ders, who con­tacted New York author­i­ties. Emer­gency respon­ders arrived at his north­ern Man­hat­tan apart­ment in full pro­tec­tive gear and took him to Belle­vue Hos­pi­tal, where he was placed in iso­la­tion and later diag­nosed with Ebola, accord­ing to officials.

Extremely strict pro­ce­dures are in place for staff dis­patched to Ebola affected coun­tries before, dur­ing, and after their assign­ments,” said Sophie Delau­nay, exec­u­tive direc­tor of Doc­tors With­out Bor­ders. “Despite the strict pro­to­cols, risk can­not be com­pletely elim­i­nated. How­ever, close post-assignment mon­i­tor­ing allows for early detec­tion of cases and for swift iso­la­tion and med­ical management.”

Spencer’s fiancee was placed in quar­an­tine, but she has shown no symp­toms so far, offi­cials said.

Until today, out of more than 700 expa­tri­ate staff deployed so far to West Africa, no MSF [Doc­tors With­out Bor­ders] staff per­son has devel­oped con­firmed Ebola symp­toms after return­ing to their home coun­try,” Doc­tors With­out Bor­ders said in a statement.

Fol­low @ABCNewsRadio
Copy­right 2014 ABC News Radio

 

Ebola 'Poses No Threat to Others,' Mayor Assures New York

Office of the Mayor NYC(NEW YORK) — The mayor of New York City on Fri­day assured a city alarmed over the pres­ence of an Ebola patient that the patient “poses no threat to others.”

We are fully pre­pared to han­dle Ebola,” Mayor Bill de Bla­sio said at a news con­fer­ence Fri­day, a day after it was announced that Dr. Craig Spencer was admit­ted to Belle­vue Hos­pi­tal with a diag­no­sis of the lethal virus.

De Bla­sio said the city’s emer­gency sys­tem has “planned for the crisis…That’s why we’ve been ahead of the game.”

Spencer, 33, was admit­ted to Belle­vue Hos­pi­tal Thurs­day, seven days after return­ing from Guinea where he had been treat­ing Ebola patients. Spencer is in sta­ble con­di­tion, accord­ing to the com­mis­sioner of the New York City Depart­ment of Health and Men­tal Hygiene Dr. Mary Bassett.

The doctor’s fiancee Mor­gan Dixon and two friends have been quar­an­tined so they can be mon­i­tored. An Uber taxi dri­ver was also in con­tact with Spencer, but was not believed to be at risk.

De Bla­sio said that there were three pub­lic estab­lish­ments that Spencer vis­ited in the day before he was symp­to­matic. Two of the estab­lish­ments — Blue Bot­tle Cof­fee, a stand on the High Line park, and a Brook­lyn bowl­ing alley called The Gut­ter — have been cleared to reopen.

A Green­wich Vil­lage restau­rant called The Meat­ball Shop was in the mid­dle of their inspec­tion dur­ing the press con­fer­ence. If the restau­rant is cleared, it plans to reopen for din­ner Fri­day night.

Offi­cials stressed that the tests are being done out of an abun­dance of cau­tion because Spencer did not dis­play symp­toms when he vis­ited those loca­tions and the first time he recorded his ele­vated 100.3 degree fever was between 10 a.m. and 11 a.m. Thursday.

A clean-up crew hired by the city’s Health Depart­ment was inside Spencer’s Man­hat­tan apart­ment on Fri­day to ensure it was disinfected.

Our con­trac­tor will clean and dis­in­fect out of an abun­dance of cau­tion. They will throw away the bed linens, tow­els, toi­letries, food in the fridge, throw away garbage,” a Health Depart­ment spokesman said. “They will wipe down hard fre­quently touched sur­faces with dis­in­fec­tant. And once com­plete, we will inspect and cer­tify the apart­ment is Okay to re-enter.”

The health offi­cial said the depart­ment did not believe there were any bod­ily flu­ids, which trans­mit the virus, in the apartment.

We do not believe there are any body flu­ids in the apart­ment because the patient did not report any vom­it­ing it diar­rhea,” the spokesman said.

Spencer’s deci­sion to travel to West Africa to work for Doc­tors With­out Bor­ders was described as a self­less act by the mayor.

These indi­vid­u­als who are going there to serve are going to be the ones to end this cri­sis,” de Bla­sio said. “We can’t have the illu­sion that is ‘we turn away from it, then some­day it will end.’”

De Bla­sio paid trib­ute to Dal­las nurse Nina Pham, who had con­tracted Ebola while treat­ing a patient who died of the virus. Pham was released Fri­day and spoke out­side the National Insti­tutes of Health in Mary­land just min­utes before the New York City press con­fer­ence started.

De Bla­sio said that her recov­ery shows that “the capac­ity of our med­ical com­mu­nity to address this issue is extraordinary.”

Pham met with Pres­i­dent Obama in the White House on her way back home to Dal­las Friday.

Fol­low @ABCNewsRadio
Copy­right 2014 ABC News Radio