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Laws to Deter Underage Drinking Appear to Work

iStock/Thinkstock(OAKLAND, Calif.) — Social host laws that hold adults respon­si­ble when under­age drink­ing is hap­pen­ing on their prop­erty may be help­ing to drive down the num­ber of teens who use alco­hol at week­end parties.

Mallie Paschall, a senior research sci­en­tist at the Pre­ven­tion Research Cen­ter in Oak­land, Cal­i­for­nia, admits that there’s no direct proof yet of a link between these laws and a decrease in under­age drinking.

How­ever, the early find­ings are encour­ag­ing after a study of 50 Cal­i­for­nia com­mu­ni­ties, half of which put the onus on par­ents or adults if peo­ple under 21 are caught imbib­ing at their homes or establishments.

In areas where social host laws were enforced, which can mean stiff fines, there were fewer reports of under­age drink­ing parties.

Paschall explains that most teens get alco­hol from social sources, such as par­ents or other adults, so it would stand to rea­son that laws that tar­get those sources will result in a decline of under­age drinking.

He adds that besides strict enforce­ment, there also has to be an aggres­sive pub­lic cam­paign about social host laws to inform par­ents about the penal­ties they face for allow­ing minors to con­sume alco­hol on their property.

Fol­low @ABCNewsRadio
Copy­right 2014 ABC News Radio

 

Humility Is the Virtue Women Want in a Man

iStock/Thinkstock(HOLLAND, Mich.) — To the cha­grin of the stereo­typ­i­cal nice guy, it seems that women are attracted to bad boys because they rep­re­sent some­thing naughty and dan­ger­ous. Cer­tainly that’s true in the movies and even in some real life cases. But as Dr. Daryl Van Ton­geren of Hope Col­lege in Michi­gan explains, what women really want in a man is some­body who exudes humil­ity rather than con­ceit. In fact, that’s how men pre­fer their women too.

In a series of three exper­i­ments involv­ing hun­dreds of col­lege stu­dents of both sexes, the over­whelm­ing major­ity were more attracted to a pos­si­ble sig­nif­i­cant other who was will­ing to “over­come desires for power and supe­ri­or­ity” in order to build and sus­tain a long-term roman­tic relationship.

Peo­ple viewed as hum­ble are bet­ter at eval­u­at­ing their own strengths and weak­nesses, have an eas­ier time accept­ing crit­i­cism and are regarded as help­ful and selfless.

So per­haps, it’s the mean guys who really fin­ish last.

Fol­low @ABCNewsRadio
Copy­right 2014 ABC News Radio

 

Nurse Says She Won't Have Officials Violate 'My Civil Rights'

Hand­out Photo(FORT KENT, Maine) — As Maine offi­cials said they were prepar­ing to get a court order to enforce a manda­tory quar­an­tine, Ebola nurse Kaci Hickox said Wednes­day night she is not will­ing to “stand here and have my civil rights violated.”

You could hug me, you could shake my hand, I would not give you Ebola,” she said out­side her Fort Kent home.

Her com­ments came hours after Maine offi­cials said they would seek to force Hickox, 33, to obey a 21-day quar­an­tine, although the order would first need to be approved by a judge before it could be enforced.

When it is made clear by an indi­vid­ual in this risk cat­e­gory that they do not intend to vol­un­tar­ily stay at home for the remain­ing 21 days, we will imme­di­ately seek a court order to ensure that they do not make con­tact with the pub­lic,” Maine Health Com­mis­sioner Mary May­hew said dur­ing a news con­fer­ence Wednes­day evening.

But legal experts say it’s not clear whether such an order would be approved by a judge.

The state has the bur­den of prov­ing that she is infected, or at least was cred­i­bly exposed to infec­tion, and also that by her own behav­ior she is likely to infect oth­ers if not con­fined,” said pub­lic health lawyer Wendy Mariner, who teaches at Boston Uni­ver­sity School of Law.

The state is not likely to have any evi­dence of that,” Mariner said, adding that Hickox should be able to prove that she isn’t infected and plans to take pre­cau­tions to not expose any­one to her bod­ily fluids.

Ear­lier Wednes­day, Maine’s gov­er­nor and other offi­cials said they were are seek­ing legal author­ity to enforce what started out as a vol­un­tary quar­an­tine. They also said state police were mon­i­tor­ing Hickox’s home “for both her pro­tec­tion and the health of the com­mu­nity,” accord­ing to a state­ment from the Maine governor’s office.

We are very con­cerned about her safety and health and that of the com­mu­nity,” Maine Gov. Paul LeP­age said. “We are explor­ing all of our options for pro­tect­ing the health and well-being of the health­care worker, any­one who comes in con­tact with her, the Fort Kent com­mu­nity and all of Maine. While we cer­tainly respect the rights of one indi­vid­ual, we must be vig­i­lant in pro­tect­ing 1.3 mil­lion Main­ers, as well as any­one who vis­its our great state.”

Hickox was treat­ing Ebola patients in Sierra Leone for Doc­tors With­out Bor­ders. She returned to the United States on Fri­day, land­ing in Newark Lib­erty Inter­na­tional Air­port in New Jer­sey, where she was ques­tioned and quar­an­tined in an out­door tent through the week­end despite hav­ing no symp­toms. She reg­is­tered a fever on an infrared ther­mome­ter at the air­port but an oral ther­mome­ter at Uni­ver­sity Hos­pi­tal in Newark showed that she actu­ally had no fever, she said.

After twice test­ing neg­a­tive for the deadly virus, Hickox was released and returned home to Maine on Mon­day. The fol­low­ing day, the state’s health com­mis­sioner announced that Maine would join the hand­ful of states going beyond fed­eral guide­lines and ask­ing that return­ing Ebola health work­ers self-quarantine.

Doc­tors with­out Bor­ders issued a state­ment on Wednes­day, dis­agree­ing with blan­ket quar­an­tines. “Such a mea­sure is not based upon estab­lished med­ical sci­ence,” the orga­ni­za­tion said. “Kaci Hickox has car­ried out impor­tant, life­sav­ing work for MSF in a num­ber of coun­tries in recent years, and we are proud to have her as a mem­ber of our orga­ni­za­tion. MSF respects Kaci’s right as a pri­vate cit­i­zen to chal­lenge exces­sive restric­tions being placed upon her.”

Our true desire is for a vol­un­tary sep­a­ra­tion from the pub­lic. We do not want to have to legally enforce an in-home quar­an­tine,” Maine Health Com­mis­sioner Mary May­hew said in a state­ment. “We are con­fi­dent that the self­less health work­ers, who were brave enough to care for Ebola patients in a for­eign coun­try, will be will­ing to take rea­son­able steps to pro­tect the res­i­dents of their own coun­try. How­ever, we are will­ing to pur­sue legal author­ity if nec­es­sary to ensure risk is min­i­mized for Mainers.”

But Hickox said she doesn’t think it is reasonable.

I will go to court to attain my free­dom,” Hickox told Good Morn­ing Amer­ica via Skype from her home­town of Fort Kent. “I have been com­pletely asymp­to­matic since I’ve been here. I feel absolutely great.”

The U.S. Cen­ters for Dis­ease Con­trol and Pre­ven­tion doesn’t con­sider health work­ers who treated Ebola patients in West Africa to be at “high risk” for catch­ing Ebola if they were wear­ing pro­tec­tive gear, accord­ing to new guide­lines announced this week. Since they have “some risk,” the CDC rec­om­mends that they undergo mon­i­tor­ing — track­ing symp­toms and body tem­per­a­ture twice a day — avoid pub­lic trans­porta­tion and take other pre­cau­tions. But the CDC doesn’t require home quar­an­tines for these workers.

Some­one isn’t con­ta­gious until Ebola symp­toms appear, accord­ing to the CDC. And even then, trans­mis­sion requires con­tact with bod­ily flu­ids such as blood and vomit.

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FDA Approves Meningitis B Vaccine

luiscar/iStockphoto/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — The U.S. Food and Drug Admin­is­tra­tion approved the first vac­cine to tar­get a strain of menin­gi­tis that caused out­breaks at Prince­ton Uni­ver­sity and the Uni­ver­sity of California-Santa Bar­bara last year.

Accord­ing to the FDA, Tru­menba pre­vents the dis­ease caused by Neis­saria menin­gi­tidis serogroup B, one of five main serogroups of the dis­ease. Pre­vi­ously approved vac­cines have cov­ered the other four main serogroups.

Recent out­breaks of serogroup B Meningo­coc­cal dis­ease on a few col­lege cam­puses have height­ened con­cerns for this poten­tially deadly dis­ease,” said Karen Midthun, direc­tor of the FDA’s Cen­ter for Bio­log­ics Eval­u­a­tion and Research.

Three ran­dom­ized stud­ies looked at about 2,800 adult patients and found that 82 per­cent of sub­jects given Tru­menba had anti­bod­ies that kill four rep­re­sen­ta­tive strains of the dis­ease in their blood­stream, com­pared to just one per­cent beforehand.

Min­i­mal side effects were reported with Tru­menba, includ­ing headache, diar­rhea, mus­cle pain, fatigue and chills.

Fol­low @ABCNewsRadio
Copy­right 2014 ABC News Radio

 

These Fatter Crash-Test Dummies May Help Prevent Road Deaths

Humanetics(NEW YORK) — Crash-test dum­mies are under­go­ing a makeover to reflect the thicker waist­lines and larger rear ends of Americans.“Studies show that obese dri­vers are 78 per­cent more likely to die in a car crash,” said Chris O’Connor…

 

Cars, Pumpkin Carving Top List of Halloween Dangers

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — One of the scari­est things about Hal­loween is the high rate of mishaps. The Con­sumer Prod­uct Safety Com­mis­sion reported more than 3,500 Halloween-related injuries in Octo­ber and Novem­ber last year.

The sta­tis­tics aren’t meant to frighten, said Kate Carr, the pres­i­dent and CEO of Safe Kids World­wide, a con­sumer safety group. Rather, they’re meant to get par­ents focused on safety.

We want every­one to have fun on Hal­loween,” she said. “That’s why it’s impor­tant to have a con­ver­sa­tion with your kids and do some planning.”

Here are tips on avoid­ing Hal­loween dan­gers:

Traf­fic Fatalities

Hal­loween ranks as the third-deadliest day for pedes­tri­ans, accord­ing to a recent National High­way Safety and Traf­fic Admin­is­tra­tion analy­sis that exam­ined a quarter-century’s worth of data.

How­ever, it’s the dead­liest for kids. Chil­dren are twice as likely to be hit by a car and killed on Hal­loween than on a typ­i­cal night, accord­ing to the Cen­ters for Dis­ease Con­trol and Prevention.

Carr advised par­ents to put reflec­tive tape on cos­tumes or have their child carry an item that glows or reflects car lights. She also urged par­ents to accom­pany kids younger than 12 on trick-or-treat rounds.

Kids who are younger than that can’t accu­rately judge speed or dis­tance to gauge how fast a car is going,” she said.

Food Aller­gies

One in 13 Amer­i­can chil­dren have been diag­nosed with food aller­gies, accord­ing to the allergy aware­ness group Food Allergy Research & Edu­ca­tion. Candy con­tain­ing soy, wheat, eggs, peanuts or tree nuts can some­times cause life-threatening symp­toms, which means trick-or-treating is usu­ally off-limits to food aller­gic kids.

This year, FARE has intro­duced pump­kins painted the color teal — the color of food allergy aware­ness — to alert par­ents to houses that give out small toys instead of candy. Peo­ple also can down­load teal pump­kin posters from the FARE website.

Accept­able trick-or-treat alter­na­tives include glow sticks, pen­cils, stick­ers and plas­tic vam­pire fangs, FARE advised. How­ever, some non-food items may still con­tain aller­gens. Play-Doh, for exam­ple, con­tains wheat. And some toys are made of latex, a poten­tial allergen.

Cuts and Bruises

Of the 3,500 Halloween-related injuries on the CPSC list, the most com­mon mishaps included burns, lac­er­a­tions from pumpkin-carving and injuries from col­li­sions related to impaired vision.

If you are plan­ning on carv­ing jack-o-lantern, make sure an adult is present and that a child is old enough to han­dle a knife or carv­ing tool prop­erly,” said Carr, adding that par­ents should con­sider using a battery-operated can­dles with jack-o-lanterns to reduce fire risk and should ensure masks and head­dresses don’t obscure a child’s abil­ity to see where they are going.

Stairs

Chil­dren ages 10 to 14 sus­tained the great­est pro­por­tion of injuries, a recent study in the jour­nal Pedi­atrics revealed. They accounted for more than 30 per­cent of the calami­ties reported on Hal­loween day. The most com­mon Halloween-related bumps and bruises came from falling down stairs and trip­ping on floors — though about 4 per­cent of the injuries involved beds and pillows.

To cut down on trips and falls, Carr said, par­ents should take a care­ful look at their child’s cos­tume to make sure they don’t drag or impede movement.

Tighten up those shoe laces so they are ready to hop, skip and jump from door to door,” she said.

Fol­low @ABCNewsRadio
Copy­right 2014 ABC News Radio

 

Maine Scrambles with How to Enforce Quarantine Against Ebola Nurse

ABC News(AUGUSTA, Maine) — Maine offi­cials are scram­bling to fig­ure out what to do about return­ing Ebola nurse Kaci Hickox, who has vowed to dis­obey its quar­an­tine rules.

The gov­er­nor and other offi­cials are seek­ing legal author­ity to enforce what started out as a vol­un­tary quar­an­tine, and state police are mon­i­tor­ing Hickox’s Fort Kent home “for both her pro­tec­tion and the health of the com­mu­nity,” accord­ing to a state­ment Wednes­day from the Maine governor’s office.

We are very con­cerned about her safety and health and that of the com­mu­nity,” Maine Gov. Paul LeP­age said in the state­ment. “We are explor­ing all of our options for pro­tect­ing the health and well-being of the health­care worker, any­one who comes in con­tact with her, the Fort Kent com­mu­nity and all of Maine. While we cer­tainly respect the rights of one indi­vid­ual, we must be vig­i­lant in pro­tect­ing 1.3 mil­lion Main­ers, as well as any­one who vis­its our great state.”

Hickox, 33, was treat­ing Ebola patients in Sierra Leone for Doc­tors With­out Bor­ders. She returned to the United States on Fri­day, land­ing in Newark Lib­erty Inter­na­tional Air­port in New Jer­sey, where she was ques­tioned and quar­an­tined in an out­door tent through the week­end despite hav­ing no symp­toms. She reg­is­tered a fever on an infrared ther­mome­ter at the air­port but an oral ther­mome­ter at Uni­ver­sity Hos­pi­tal in Newark showed that she actu­ally had no fever, she said.

After twice test­ing neg­a­tive for the deadly virus, Hickox was released and returned home to Maine on Mon­day. The fol­low­ing day, the state’s health com­mis­sioner announced that Maine would join the hand­ful of states going beyond fed­eral guide­lines and ask­ing that return­ing Ebola health work­ers self-quarantine.

Our true desire is for a vol­un­tary sep­a­ra­tion from the pub­lic. We do not want to have to legally enforce an in-home quar­an­tine,” Main Health Com­mis­sioner Mary May­hew said in a state­ment. “We are con­fi­dent that the self­less health work­ers, who were brave enough to care for Ebola patients in a for­eign coun­try, will be will­ing to take rea­son­able steps to pro­tect the res­i­dents of their own coun­try. How­ever, we are will­ing to pur­sue legal author­ity if nec­es­sary to ensure risk is min­i­mized for Mainers.”

But Hickox said she doesn’t think it is reasonable.

I will go to court to attain my free­dom,” Hickox told ABC’s Good Morn­ing Amer­ica Wednes­day via Skype from her home­town of Fort Kent. “I have been com­pletely asymp­to­matic since I’ve been here. I feel absolutely great.”

The U.S. Cen­ters for Dis­ease Con­trol and Pre­ven­tion doesn’t con­sider health work­ers who treated Ebola patients in West Africa to be at “high risk” for catch­ing Ebola if they were wear­ing pro­tec­tive gear, accord­ing to new guide­lines announced this week. Since they have “some risk,” the CDC rec­om­mends that they undergo mon­i­tor­ing — track­ing symp­toms and body tem­per­a­ture twice a day — avoid pub­lic trans­porta­tion and take other pre­cau­tions. But the CDC doesn’t require home quar­an­tines for these workers.

Some­one isn’t con­ta­gious until Ebola symp­toms appear, accord­ing to the CDC. And even then, trans­mis­sion requires con­tact with bod­ily flu­ids such as blood and vomit.

I remain really con­cerned by these manda­tory quar­an­tine poli­cies for aid work­ers,” Hickox said Wednes­day. “I think we’re just only adding to the stigma­ti­za­tion that, again, is not based on sci­ence or evidence.”

Fol­low @ABCNewsRadio
Copy­right 2014 ABC News Radio

 

Runner Takes on NYC Marathon After Nearly Losing His Leg

Kevin Dun­bar(NEW YORK) — Among the thou­sands of run­ners in the 2014 New York Marathon aim­ing to break per­sonal or even world records, one run­ner will sim­ply be happy to cross the fin­ish line on his own two feet.

Ken Dun­bar, 33, nearly lost his right leg three years ago after an acci­dent dur­ing a soc­cer game. A rare com­pli­ca­tion from a sin­gle kick dur­ing the game led to swelling and tis­sue loss in Dunbar’s leg.

It started when a player acci­den­tally kicked him squarely on his right calf. Dun­bar said he felt a pain sim­i­lar to a cramp.

When you get a cramp, it feels like the mus­cles are tight­en­ing and won’t stop pulling,” the Cincin­nati man told ABC News. “Over the course of the next hour or so, it kept get­ting worse. “

By the end of the late-night soc­cer game, Dun­bar was in the hos­pi­tal unable to put even the slight­est pres­sure on his right leg.

Dun­bar said doc­tors at the hos­pi­tal quickly real­ized he had dan­ger­ous con­di­tion called com­part­ment syn­drome, where the blood sup­ply is cut off from part of the limb because of an injury and swelling.

The swelling starts to push in on bone and all of that and it cuts off blood cir­cu­la­tion,” Dun­bar said.

A hematoma or a col­lec­tion of blood sim­i­lar to a bruise in Dunbar’s leg caused swelling in his lower right leg, cut­ting off blood flow to the area. Severe cases of com­part­ment syn­drome can result in tis­sue death that leads to amputation.

For at least one day he was still unsure whether he was going to get to keep his leg.

They were check­ing the pulse every hour,” he recalled. “If I started to lose a pulse in my leg. They were going to amputate.”

To relieve the swelling, doc­tors made inci­sions from the bot­tom of Dunbar’s knee to his ankle. When tis­sue started to die in his leg, Dun­bar said doc­tors had to go in and cut it out. He spent more than a week in a hos­pi­tal bed on mor­phine with no chance of quick recovery.

As he lay in bed, high on painkillers, Dun­bar remem­bers one moment clearly.

If I can get through this week with­out [their] tak­ing my leg, I am going to start run­ning again,” he recalled thinking.

When Dun­bar was finally released, he still had his leg, but was unable to put any pres­sure on his injured leg, much less run on it.

I was on crutches and it was wrapped up so much and it was very, very painful,” he remembered.

But even at that early point he was deter­mined to get back into a race.

Dur­ing four months of intense phys­i­cal train­ing, Dun­bar focused on one goal: He wanted to run.

While he had been a run­ner in high school, he spent over a decade try­ing out other sports as he mar­ried and had three chil­dren. He said the acci­dent made him want to get back to his roots as a runner.

We fought through phys­i­cal ther­apy, which was months and months of phys­i­cal labor,” he said. “They got me back to where I was able to run.”

When he was finally approved to run, Dun­bar set his goal on his first race in years: a half-marathon.

I did my first half-marathon,” Dun­bar said. “As soon as I got done, I said I need to do a full.”

Dun­bar has since run nine marathons in six states and plans to run in a marathon in all 50 states. But the father of three is espe­cially excited to run his first New York marathon along with around 50,000 participants.

New York has been on my bucket list,” Dun­bar said. “Between New York and Boston, those are the two that I want to do the most. [New York is] the one every run­ner wants to do.”

After fight­ing back from his injury, Dun­bar says he doesn’t mind the lengthy train­ing it takes to run a marathon.

With any train­ing you’re going to have your ups and downs and bumps and bruises,” he said. “That’s part of what makes marathon­ing so enjoy­able. [After] 18 to 23 weeks of train­ing, you don’t know how it’s going to go.”

Dun­bar said the race will be just the sec­ond time he’s vis­ited New York. But that this time he expects to see much more of the city.

The fact I’m going to go through all five bor­oughs and all dif­fer­ent types of New York City,” Dun­bar cited as what he’s most excited about.

The fans in New York, there is no com­par­i­son,” he said.

Fol­low @ABCNewsRadio
Copy­right 2014 ABC News Radio