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Warlike Metaphors Make the Cancer Fight Harder

iStock/Thinkstock(ANN ARBOR, Mich.) — Perhaps we’ve been going about the war on cancer all wrong.That’s the finding of University of Michigan researcher David Hauser, who says that metaphors used when describing people’s efforts to resist the disease, such as “fight” and “battle,” can detract from cancer-prevention behaviors.In one experiment, Hauser had more than 300 participants read one of two passage about colorectal cancer. One constantly referred to this cancer as an “enemy” while the other contained no such metaphors.Essentially, people who read the passage...
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Study: Many Patients Don’t Know How to Use Inhalers, Epi-Pens Properly

Stockbyte/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- A new study found that many patients with inhalers or epi-pens do not use them correctly. According to the study, published in the journal Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, researchers at the University of Texas looked at a small sampling of patients and found that 84 percent of those with severe food and medication allergies are unable to use their epinephrine injector properly. They also determined that 93 percent of study participants were unable to use their asthma inhaler properly.Researchers say that...
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Clot Removal Linked to Improved Odds of Limiting Disability in Stroke Victims

Jochen Sands/Digital Vision/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- A new study shows that removing the blood clot that causes a stroke may improve odds of limiting disability caused by that stroke.The study, published in the New England Journal of Medicine, notes that while intravenous alteplase -- used to break down blood clots -- within 4.5 hours of the onset of stroke symptoms is the only therapy with proof of efficacy, intraarterial therapy -- including the retrieval of the clot -- may be more effective at preventing disability. Researchers at...
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UV Exposure">Pilots Risk Significant UV Exposure

Digital Vision./Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Pilots should remember to pack their sunscreen, researchers said, after a study noted that flying at 30,000 feet exposes pilots to significant ultraviolet radiation.The study, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association Dermatology, found that pilots flying at 30,000 feet for 56 minutes receive the same amount of UV-A radiation as is received during a 20-minute session in a tanning bed. The windshields on planes block UV-B radiation, but not UV-A. The research was prompted by recent findings that pilots and cabin...
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