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One in 12 Americans Don’t Follow Prescription Medication Directions in Effort to Save Money

Fuse/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- New data provided by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows that one in 12 Americans choose not to take prescription medication as directed to save money.Eight percent of Americans, the CDC says, do not take prescription medicine as directed in an effort to save money. An even larger 15 percent said they have asked their physician for a lower-cost medication than what was prescribed for them. The CDC also notes that alternative cost-reducing strategies including alternative drug therapy and purchase...
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Cat Gets Oxygen Mask After Surviving Fire Inside Wall

Mike Watson Images/moodboard/Thinkstock(CHARLOTTE, N.C.) -- Firefighters outside Charlotte, North Carolina, were nearly done battling a house fire burning for more than four hours when one of them said they discovered a cat who miraculously survived the massive inferno stuck in a wall."One of our guys was walking around the house, which was almost completely collapsed, when he heard a meow," Mint Hill Fire Chief David Leath told ABC News Wednesday. "He pried one of the outside walls and found the cat stuck inside."The firefighter got the...
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Organ Transplants Could Provide Two Million Extra Years of Life, Researchers Say

targovcom/iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Organ transplants in the United States may lead to as many as two million extra years of life, researchers say.Looking at data since the FDA first approved solid-organ transplants in 1983, researchers say they determined the survival benefit of organ transplants by comparing patients on the transplant list who received a transplant to those who did not receive a transplant over a 25-year span. During that time frame, kidney transplants were most common, followed by liver, heart, lung, pancreas and intestine transplants. Researchers...
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Study: Insurers May Be Using Drug Costs to Discriminate

Thomas Northcut/Digital Vision/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- A study in the New England Journal of Medicine claims that insurers may be using the costs of certain drugs to discriminate against "high-cost patients."Researchers analyzed "adverse tiering" in 12 states using the federal health insurance marketplace. Of those 12 states, six states included insurers cited in a complaint submitted to the Department of Health and Human Services in May 2014 (Delaware, Florida, Louisiana, Michigan, South Carolina and Utah), and the six most populous states with none of the mentioned insurers...
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